Radiocarbon dating wikipedia

What I want to do in this video is kind of introduce you to the idea of, one, how carbon-14 comes about, and how it gets into all living things. They can also be alpha particles, which is the same thing as a helium nucleus. And they're going to come in, and they're going to bump into things in our atmosphere, and they're actually going to form neutrons. And we'll show a neutron with a lowercase n, and a 1 for its mass number. And what's interesting about this is this is constantly being formed in our atmosphere, not in huge quantities, but in reasonable quantities. Because as soon as you die and you get buried under the ground, there's no way for the carbon-14 to become part of your tissue anymore because you're not eating anything with new carbon-14.And then either later in this video or in future videos we'll talk about how it's actually used to date things, how we use it actually figure out that that bone is 12,000 years old, or that person died 18,000 years ago, whatever it might be. So let me just draw the surface of the Earth like that. So then you have the Earth's atmosphere right over here. And 78%, the most abundant element in our atmosphere is nitrogen. And we don't write anything, because it has no protons down here. And what's interesting here is once you die, you're not going to get any new carbon-14. You can't just say all the carbon-14's on the left are going to decay and all the carbon-14's on the right aren't going to decay in that 5,730 years.For the most accurate work, variations are compensated by means of calibration curves.The method was developed by Willard Libby and his colleagues at the University of Chicago in 1949.

And then you can use that rate to actually determine how long ago that thing must've died. It would be a pretty reasonable estimate to say, well, that thing must be 5,730 years old.

I am the Deputy Director of the Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, in the Research Lab for Archaeology and the History of Art.

I work in the field of radiocarbon dating, with specific reference to archaeology, focussing particularly on improvements to reliability and accuracy in sample pretreatment chemistry.

Two effects also interfere with the dating of very recent samples.

The testing of thermonuclear weapons produced an increase in atmospheric C they contain is infinitesimal.